Home Human Resources Effective People Management | Motivation | Job Design | Reward Systems

Effective People Management | Motivation | Job Design | Reward Systems

When people are given greater rewards than what they deserve, at first their performance progresses, but then they start reasoning that they really are worthy and begin to slack off.

Effective People Management | Motivation | Job Design | Reward Systems management Effective People Management | Motivation | Job Design | Reward Systems effective people management
Effective People Management | Motivation | Job Design | Reward Systems

The performance of the management always assesses by the effectiveness of the results or outcomes. The effectiveness comes from the deliverance of right level of effort from the people who involved in the process of work that basically targets key goals.

As far as the key requirements of the ‘ effective management  in the organisations are concerned, it fundamentally involves a key understanding of behaviour adaptation, motivation, job design, reward systems, and many other elements.

Behaviour Adaptation

The results or outcomes of Human Resource practices are well-determined based on the level of recognition of importance of the behaviour and its connection to organisation performance.

In any organisation, it is highly imperative to make certain that people or learners are profoundly understood the behaviour and its consequences.  The results or outcomes of Human Resource practices are well-determined based on the level of recognition of importance of the behaviour and its connection to organisation performance.

However, the behavioural changes can be anticipated from the employees once the following elements are profoundly considered to be adapted and then implemented by the organisation.

  • Positive reinforcement vs. penalty: A clear behavioural difference can be created in the organisation by rewarding people who show a constant as well as positive behaviour.

For example, giving an employee a funded vacation for exceeding allocated targets.

 At the same time, it is also very much possible to induce behavioural changes in employees who show bad behaviour by cutting rewards.

When it comes to the key advantage of positive reinforcement, it basically makes workforce feel valued and cheered.

It eventually helps in generating positive results in terms of productivity, revenue and profits.

On the contrary, focusing too much on positive reinforcement can lead to exhaustion, which can eventually weaken the outcomes.

  • Negative reinforcement: It basically entails removing something undesirable to change behaviour.

For example, stopping day-to-day gatherings with a manager to discuss work performance after an employee has raised his individual production levels.

Despite the fact that the negative reinforcement is one of the highly influenced tools for inspiring employee behaviour to perform better, it is at times confused with punishment.

Expectancy Theory

The expectancy theory of motivation has become a commonly acknowledged model for enlightening how people make decisions on the subject of various behavioural alternatives.

Expectancy theory suggests that motivation depends on individuals’ anticipations about their capability to execute tasks and receive desired rewards.

The expectancy theory of motivation has become a commonly acknowledged model for enlightening how people make decisions on the subject of various behavioural alternatives.

Expectancy theory compromises the following intentions:

  • As soon as ‘decision making time’ arrives pertaining to behavioural options selection process, people normally choose the preference with the utmost Motivation Forces (MF).
  • The motivational force for a behaviour, action, or task is a function of three diverse perceptions: Expectancy, Instrumentality, and Valance.

Expectancy Theory | Essentials Of Motivation | Instrumentality | Valance

Job Design

Job design fundamentally involves the duty of goals and responsibilities to be completed by employees. Managers in many cases may wilfully change job design to raise productivity, quality of the product or service or employee motivation.

For instance, when employees are involved in carrying out responsibilities assessed to be insipidly repetitive, managers may introduce job rotation, which means shifting employees from one job to another to allocate them a better range of responsibilities.

Accounting & Finance

Entrepreneurship

Leadership

marketing

Operations

Strategy

On the other hand, it is very much possible that the managers may also accidentally influence job design through introduction of innovative equipment or technologies, which can change how jobs are completed and the actual nature of jobs.

For example, the key motivation behind advanced technologies such as automated teller machines and the technologies that simplify mass production is basically to reduce the tasks performed by a single employee.

More innovative technological tools, in contrast, may enhance levels of accountability, recognition and opportunities for progress and development.

These technologies build it greater need for employee training for the reason that advanced level skills and superior competence are essential to lead the newly assigned responsibilities.

Job Design | Key Motives | Characteristics of Jobs and People | HR

Collective Approaches to Job Design | Job Enrichment | Job Rotation

Reward Systems

Reward system is not simply about pay and benefits. It is similarly concerned with non-financial rewards such as gratitude, learning and development opportunities and superior job responsibility.

Reward system principally deals with the approaches, policies and practices required to make certain that the input of people to the organisation is acknowledged by both financial and non-financial means.

It is about the plan, application and maintenance of reward, which vitally aims at meeting the requirements of both the organisation and its stakeholders.

The general objective is to reward people fairly, impartially and reliably in accordance with their value to the organization.

Reward system is not simply about pay and benefits. It is similarly concerned with non-financial rewards such as gratitude, learning and development opportunities and superior job responsibility.

Strategic Reward System | Aims | Approaches | Policies | Practices

As a whole, when people are given greater rewards than what they deserve, at first their performance progresses, but then they start reasoning that they really are worthy and begin to slack off.  In order to avoid pitfalls and attain better results, it is highly essential to be well-adjusted and carefully reviewed.

Human Resource Management: Definitions & Key Knowledge ?

Expectancy Theory | Essentials Of Motivation | Instrumentality | Valance

Job Design | Key Motives | Characteristics of Jobs and People | HR

Collective Approaches to Job Design | Job Enrichment | Job Rotation

Strategic Reward System | Aims | Approaches | Policies | Practices

Hierarchy Of Needs Theory | Maslow’s FIVE Needs Systems | Motivation

Impacts & Implication Of Hierarchy Of Needs Theory On HR Management

Advantages, Disadvantages & Limitations Of Maslow ’s ‘Hierarchy of Needs’ Theory

Frederick Herzberg ’s Two-Factor Theory of Motivation | Motivation-Hygiene

Implications, Limitations & Suggestions of TWO-Factor Theory of Motivation

Theory X and Theory Y | McGregor and Leadership | Motivation | HR

The Hard and Soft Approach of Theory X | Key Issues with Theory X

Management Implications of Theory Y | Motivation | Leadership

Challenges and Limitations of Theory X and Theory Y | Motivation

ERG Theory of Motivation | ERG Model Vs ” Hierarchy of Needs ” Theory

Evaluation of ERG Theory | Advantages | Disadvantages | Validity